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How-to's

How-to's

This is How You Hang Pictures On Railings And Molding

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Pictures and artwork on the walls are ways to help make a house a home. They offer interesting visuals that add to the beauty of and project your personality to a home. It doesn’t matter if you are living in an apartment or a large single-family house, pictures and artwork gives a home a personal touch.

Everyone has memories of moving into a new apartment for the first time and hanging pictures and artwork on the walls. You probably didn’t give it much thought and took a hammer and nails, knocked the nails into the wall, and hung the picture or artwork over the nail. It seemed like an easy thing to do. However, the simple process of just hammering a nail into a wall damages the wall. Moreover, if the frame containing the picture or artwork is very heavy, then the shear weight can present problems. If you hang several pictures from the same wall, then the combined weight of all those frames can multiply the problem. So what can you do? We’re here to help you explore your best options for hanging pictures from picture rail molding, whether you install a picture rail system piece-by-piece or use an all-in-one kit, we will help!

Hanging from Picture Rail Molding: An Overview

One method of hanging pictures that prevents this from being an issue is using picture rails or crown molding between the wall and ceiling. If you live in a home that was constructed prior to the 1930s, then there is a good chance that it is already trimmed with crown molding. If not, you can acquire the molding from a hardware store or lumberyard. Rails are also available from hardware stores as an option. However, you are then obligated to install the molding or the rails yourself or hire a professional to perform the work.

Moreover, selecting this method of hanging pictures means that you will have to consider the questions of how to hang pictures on picture rail molding or how to hang pictures from crown molding. Getting involved in such a project means independently buying necessary accessories needed to perform the task. That would include the proper hooks, wires or cord needed for hanging pictures on a picture rail or molding.

An alternative to the piecemeal method of collecting the necessary equipment yourself is to purchase a system that includes the pieces essential for a proper installation. Shades Picture Hanging Systems offers an assortment of STAS designed and manufactured picture-hanging solutions that include everything you will need — picture rail, the picture rail hooks, and the wiring.

The Project

It is not surprising that enthusiastic do-it-yourselfers may want to get involved in how to hang pictures on picture rail molding or how to hang pictures from crown molding themselves.

If your house is not already equipped with crown molding, then the first thing you need to consider is using picture rails or crown molding.

Picture rails are strips of molding that attach to the walls just below the ceiling. They were very popular in New England and often used in southern townhouses during the Victorian era.

Today they can be found at hardware stores including The Home Depot. Moreover, they are affordable. For example, you can purchase a 1-3/4-inch rail for about $1.00 per linear foot.

The items you will need to place the rails include:

✓ Tape measure
✓ Pencil or marker
✓ Chalk
✓ Construction adhesive
✓ Miter saw
✓ Pneumatic nailer
✓ 2-1/2-inch brads
✓ Paintable caulk
✓ Level
✓ Stud finder
✓ Duct tape
✓ Wall trim molding
✓ Ladder

Installation of a rail can be performed in four steps.

  1. Use the tape measure to measure from the ceiling 12-inches to 18-inches down onto the wall and about 1-inch from each end of the wall and mark the spots with the pencil or marker. Use the chalk to draw a line connecting the marks.
  2. Measure the wall and cut out the pieces of rail to length. If the wall is longer than the rail, use the miter saw to miter the pieces together. Create a 45-degree cut on the rail to accommodate the miter. Or you can glue strips of rails together using wood glue on the edges and duct tape as a clamp before starting the installation. Allow one hour for the glue to dry.
  3. Place a bead of construction adhesive to the back of the rail, and then align the bottom of the rail with the chalk line or level.
  4. Use the pneumatic nailer and brads to attach the rail into the studs behind the wall. Snap in one nail every 6-inches and be sure that the rail stays in alignment with the chalk line. Fill the nail holes with a bit of paintable caulk and apply a bead of chalk where the rail meets the wall.
  5. Troubleshooting

    It is suggested that you cut the rail a little bit longer than you need to avoid cutting it too short and make adjustments as you place on the wall. Keep in mind that the 45-degree cut described in step 2 works when the wall is a 90-degree angle or square. As you do the project, you may discover that your walls aren’t square. So a 45-degree cut to accommodate the miter may not present the proper angle. You may have to do some re-cutting.

    Finally, when tweaking the angle of cuts to permit the rail to fit in corners, make certain that rail pieces that are joined together are cut to the same angle.

    How to Install Crown Molding

    If you decide to use crown molding instead of rails, then you first have to decide what type of crown molding to use. Wood molding may be too expensive. A possible alternative is medium density fiberboard (MDF), which is a combination of wood and resins and comes pre-primed and ready to paint. Crown molding is also made of softwoods including poplar, pine, and spruce or high-density polyurethane foam.

    Items you will need to install crown molding include:

      ✓ Hammer
      ✓ Tape measure
      ✓ 4-foot level
      ✓ Miter saw
      ✓ Drill
      ✓ Clamps
      ✓ Stud finder
      ✓ Finishing nailer
      ✓ Chalk gun
      ✓ Nails
      ✓ Molding
      ✓ Chalk
      ✓ Wood putty

      Some things to keep in mind before you start the installation of crown molding include:

      ⚠ Outside corners are mitered, but inside corners are coped. A coped joint is one piece of molding cut to layer against the profile of another piece of molding.

      ⚠ Wear appropriate hearing and eye protection when cutting the molding.

      Here are step-by-step instructions on how to install crown molding.

      1. Measure the walls just below the ceiling and mark the locations of the studs behind the wall with a stud finder and pencil. Put the markings at a location that will not be covered with the molding.
      2. Cut the molding to fit each wall and draw layout lines on the wall and ceiling.
        Place the molding using the markings that identify where the studs are transfer these markings onto the molding.
      3. Drill holes at each mark on the molding and nail in place.
      4. As you add molding be sure to lay out the cope joint on its edge. Draw a line in the general direction you plan to cut the molding, which is about a 45-degree angle.
      5. Set up the miter saw.
      6. Position the molding so that the ceiling edge is flat on the bottom of the miter box and the wall edge is tight against the fence.
      7. Cut a 45-degree angle in the general direction of the line you drew in step 5.
      8. Undercut along the profile with a coping saw.
      9. Tilt the coping saw at a 45-degree angle to create a razor-thin edge where the two pieces will meet.
      10. Test fit the cut. You may find that you will have to do some more minor cutting to ensure a perfect fit.
      11. Sand and file high spots to ensure a tight fit.
      12. Use a square cut on the uncoped end of the molding that is 1/8-inch longer than the wall.
      13. Flex the molding in place.
      14. Secure the molding to the wall and ceiling with nails when the molding lies on the wall without any gaps.
      15. Putty the nail holes.
      16. Rub a bead of calk in the seams, wipe it smooth with a wet finger, and then paint the molding.

      Hanging Pictures On A Picture Rail Or Crown Molding

      Items you will need to hang a picture on a picture rail or crown molding include:

      ✓ Pencil or marker
      ✓ Heavy-duty wire cutter or pliers that can cut wire
      ✓ Painters’ or masking tape
      ✓ Drill and bit
      ✓ Picture rail hooks
      ✓ Picture rail hangers
      ✓ Picture molding hooks
      ✓ Braided cord or wire
      ✓ Eyelet screws with D- ring

      Picture rail hooks and picture molding hooks come in a wide variety of styles, shapes, and sizes. Brass hooks are suggested when hanging very heavy pictures or artwork and stamped hooks are ideal for hanging lighter pictures.

      Here are step-by-step instructions on how to hang pictures on picture rail molding and how to hang pictures from crown molding.

      How to Hang Pictures from Rail Molding and Crown Molding

      Install eyelet screws with a D-ring on top of the right and left side of the frame. The higher you install the screws, the flatter the picture will hang on the wall. On the other hand, the lower on the picture frame you place the screws, the more the frame will tilt forward. Drill a pilot hole in the frame, but make sure you don’t drill all the way through the frame.

      1. Screw in the eyelet screws.
      2. Hold the picture against the wall at the height you want it to hang. Mark the spot on the wall above the center of the frame.
      3. Place a hook on the rail or molding directly above the center mark.
      4. Lay the picture frame face down on a table and place a strip of painters’ tape or masking tape across the frame just above the eyelet screws.
      5. Mark the position of the screws as well as the center spot of the frame onto the tape. Measure how far the screws are from the top of the frame and transfer to the wall by measuring that distance below the center mark on the wall.
      6. Take the tape off of the back of the frame and place it on the wall at the marks you made.
      7. Hang a cord or wire over the hook on the rail or molding and line up with the marks you made that represent the locations of the eyelet screws. Make a bend in the cord or wire where it meets the tape and make sure that a mark is made in the cord or wire after the bend.
      8. Thread the cord or wire through the rings of the eyelet screws and stop when you get to the mark made by the bending of the wire or cord.
      9. Wrap the cord or wire tightly around the screws so that it is secure and then tie the ends together securely so there is no slack in the middle of the frame. Make sure you make a strong knot.
      10. Drape the cord or wire over the hook.
      11. Slide the cord or wire back and forth over the hook until the picture hangs straight.
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How-to's

How Do Museums Hang Airplanes?

air-and-space-wright-brother

Museums are great places to go to when you want to observe and learn about fine arts, history, the sciences, and just about every other topic that can touch the imagination of man. How you display the artifacts, art pieces, and other items must help to make the display appear natural and appealing. (image via airandspace.si.edu)

Sometimes the weight of the items limits how they can be displayed. The display of very heavy objects like, say an airplane, may cause museum exhibit planners to opt for placing them on the floor. However, that could cause space issues that could limit the size of the display or offer obstructions for museum visitors who roam the exhibits.

When it comes to space issues, many museum exhibition planners are turning toward methods that include hanging the heavy items from the ceiling. If you are interested in hanging your own historical pieces or just model airplanes, jump to our instruction section here.

Air and Space-saving Style

That is what museums that host air and space memorabilia have turned to. Museums all over the world that feature such items are hanging them from the ceiling. The Smithsonian Institution’s Air and Space Museum is just one example of an establishment that is using this method to showcase airplanes of historic significance. The museum has two locations –- one in Washington, DC and one at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. These planes include:

– The Wright Flyer, the first powered airplane to take to the air at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on December 17, 1903.
– The American Aerolights Double Eagle, the first ultralight aircraft used by the police.
– The Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor, also known as the “Tin Goose” that was the largest civil aircraft in America when it flew for the first time on August 2, 1926
– The Pitts S-1S Special biplane, known as the ultimate competition aerobatic aircraft in the early 1970s.

Airplanes are not only heavy; they are also large and are made of all sorts of materials that may affect the area of the ceiling that is accommodating the weight.

For example, The Wright Flyer (above) is constructed of a wood airframe covered by fabric muslin and includes an aluminum engine crankcase. It has a 40-foot, 4-inch wingspan; it is 21-feet, 1-inch long; it stands 9-feet, 4-inches tall; and has a gross weight of 750-pounds.

The American Aerolights Double Eagle has a 35-foot wingspan; it is 15-feet long, 10-feet tall, and has a gross weight of 660-pounds.

The Ford 5-AT Tri-Motor (below) includes aluminum, iron, cooper, and metal alloys as well as leather, fabrics, plastics, glass, rubbers, insulation and internal airplane components. Its wingspan is 77-feet, 10-inches; it is 49-feet, 10-inches tall; and has a gross weight of 12,650-pounds.

How Do Museums Hang Airplanes?
from primeportal.net

The Pitts S-1S Special biplane is made of steel and fabric covering and has an upper wingspan of 17-feet, 4-inches, a length of 15-feet, 6-inches; a height of 5-feet, 6-inches and a gross weight of 1,100-pounds.

How Do Museums Hang Airplanes?
from Skytamer.com

Hanging Model Airplanes

Items necessary for hanging a model airplane include:

✓ Wire Coat Hangar
✓ Pliers capable of cutting wire
✓ Wire
✓ Eyelets or Loopholes

A brief instruction: Insert eyelets onto solid parts of the plane, thread wire through the loops, and attach the wires to the appropriate hook that can be attached to the ceiling.

If you would like to preserve the integrity of your walls and display a more clean, elegant presentation, a rail-system is a wise choice.
Shades Picture Hanging Systems has STAS hanging hardware that can be used to hang airplanes. The system includes ceiling hooks that can be used on suspended ceilings, perlon loop cord or steel loop cable, Smartspring, Zipper hooks or zipper pro security hooks to hang the object from the drop ceiling hook.

Shades STAS Cliprail Max Kit permits an installation that is flush against the ceiling. The kit includes a rail that is 59-1/16-inches long, two 59-inch Cobra Perlon Cords, two Smartspring® picture frame hangs, one combicap, one rail connector and installation hardware. Just add more hooks and wire to accommodate heavier objects.

If you are a member of a family who includes someone who likes to construct model airplanes and display them, then you may want to consider hanging them from the ceiling. The task is not difficult!

Rail-system Method

A hanging system kit offers total ease and preservation of your walls. These all-in-one kits are perfect for hanging airplanes. Shades offers STAS-brand kits that can be used to hang model airplanes. They include:

STAS Dropping Ceiling Hook with Loop Perlon Cord and Zipper Hook.
STAS Drop Ceiling Hook, Loop Perlon Cord, and Zipper Pro Security Hook.

Although a do-it-yourselfer or a staff at a museum can go out and purchase each item needed to hang an airplane or model airplane individually from a hardware store or chain, it may be better to purchase everything you need in one kit or system so there are no questions concerning whether the hardware will accommodate the item you wish to hang. Shades Picture Hanging has the appropriate hanging system or kits that will permit you to hang a real or model airplane.

Traditional Hanging Methods

Items you will need to hang a model airplane from the ceiling include:

✓ A Model Airplane
✓ A Needle
✓ A Candle and Matches
✓ Fishing Line
✓ Glue
✓ Marker
✓ Ceiling Hook

  1. First determine where the model airplane will hang. It can go high enough to avoid hitting heads or in a spot that is out of the way. Recessed ceilings are a great location, but corners are good too.
  2. Light the candle and then heat the needle over the candle until it is red hot. Quickly wipe away any soot from the needle and then insert it straight into the plastic of the model airplane. Place one hole near the cockpit area, one near the tail, and one in the top center of each wing.
  3. Use heavy-test fishing line. Measure the distance you want the plane to hang from the ceiling and add another 12-inches. So if you want your plane to hang 20-inches from the ceiling, measure out 52-inches of fishing line and cut (20 + 20 = 52) and cut two lines.
  4. Push the line through the holes. Push one end of one line into the forward hole in the fuselage and secure in place with a drop of superglue. Push the other end of the same line in the aft hole and secure that with a drop of superglue. This line will align the pitch of the plane’s nose.Take the second line and put one side in each of the holes on the each wing. This line will manage the angle of the wings.
  5. Ceiling hook setup. Attach a ceiling hook to the ceiling where you want to hang the model.Suspend both lines from the model onto the hook. Pull the lines up and down to adjust the alignment of the plane until it is hanging in the desired position.Use the marker to place a mark on each line where it contacts the hook.Remove the lines from the hook and tie them together at the marks.Hang the plane from the knots to test angles before cutting off any excess line and then re-hang over the hook.
  6. Test the hanging position.Use monofilament loops to hang wood or metal models. Loop under the fuselage, around the tail section, near the nose, and the wings and hang from any fastening point.
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How-to'sInspiration

No Nails, No Problem: How to Hang Pictures Without Nails

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It can be a pain to cover up nail holes after moving your picture gallery. Even worse, if you are renting you can lose your security deposit if the landlord has to patch up too many holes. The best way to combat the nail problem is hanging pictures without nails. Not using nails is much simpler and you can change the pictures without having to worry about spackling, sanding, and repainting.

So just what is the best way to hang pictures on the wall without using nails? There are few different ways that are simple, easy, and affordable.

Jump to: Picture Rail System | Adhesives | Removable Hooks

Preparation: Hanging Pictures Without Damaging Wall

There are a few different ways you can hang pictures without putting holes in the wall.

The first step to creating your gallery is finding the right space. Look around the room and find an area that is large enough to hang your pictures and artwork without having them too crowded together. The posters, frames, and/or art should be evenly spaced apart so the area doesn’t look cluttered.

The gallery area should be at eye level, as this is the most comfortable way to look at your artwork and pictures. Your neck is going to get sore if you have to stare up and you won’t notice the pictures if you have to bend down. To measure eye level, run a tape measure from the floor to the ceiling. Notice where your eyes naturally gaze while standing about a foot away from the wall. Once you have measured this, make a mark on the tape measure.

Prepping the Area and Frames

Now that you have found where you want your gallery to be, it is time to prep the area and the frames. This is an important step because if the area is not properly cleaned and prepared, the frames and artwork will not stay on the wall. You do not want all your work to go to waste because you have skipped this simple step – so don’t skip it!

Clean the surface of the wall with isopropyl alcohol and a clean cloth. Allow the area to completely dry before attempting to put anything on it. Do the same thing on the back of the picture frame, artwork, or poster.

The next step is to prepare the frame by removing the hanging hardware. When you are hanging artwork without nails, the frame usually needs to be flush against the wall. In addition, the hanging hardware can get in the way of the hanging systems, so it is best to just remove it completely.

Prepping the Area and Frames

Option 1: Picture Rail System

Picture hanging systems are another simple way to hang pictures without using nails. When using a system like STAS, you will need to keep the hanging hardware on your frames so they can hang on the hook. The system uses rails, cables, and hooks to hang your artwork. The rail attaches flush against the wall or ceiling and comes in a white or aluminum color to match your interior décor.

Once the rail is in place, attach the cord to the rail so and slide it to the place where you want your picture hung. The steel cable cords can handle much more weight than the adhesive way of hanging pictures. The cords are available in white or black, so they can blend in or stand out against the wall.

After the cord is attached, you will need a hook to hang the picture on. The hooks come in various sizes and hold either eight pounds, 33 pounds, or 44 pounds. Once the pictures are hung on the system, they can be slid across the wall until you find the perfect spot.

Want to know more? Watch our step-by-step instructional videos here.

stas picture hanging system

Option 2: Adhesives

Adhesives are one way to hang pictures without nails. These come in sets where one side attaches to the picture frame and the other side sticks to the wall. They stay together by the Velcro in the middle. One set of strips will hold one 8×10 inch frame or three pounds. Two sets of strips will hold one 11×17 inch frame or up to six pounds. Four sets of strips will hold an 18×24 inch frame or up to twelve pounds. Make sure you have the appropriate strips for your frame otherwise it will fall off the wall.

The strips should be attached to each corner of the frame. If you are only using one set, put on the top of the frame. When using two sets of strips, one each should be placed on each corner at the top. If you are using four sets of strips, place one set on all four corners of the frame.

Now it is time to put the strips on the wall. Put the frame and strips on the wall. Peel the frame off the strips that are attached to the wall so the frame comes free but the strips stay on the wall. Press the strips on the wall firmly and wait one hour before hanging the frame back up. This ensures the strips attach securely to the wall.

Adhesives

Option 3: Removable Hooks

Removable hooks are perfect for hanging pictures without nails. Depending on which of the following method you use, you may need to use the hanging hardware that comes with the frame.

The first method will use the hardware that comes with the frame. The hooks work similar to the adhesive, as they stick to the wall. Make sure to thoroughly clean the wall with isopropyl alcohol and a clean cloth before working with the area. Once it is dry, place the hook on the wall and let it sit for an hour before you hang your picture.

For this next method, you will use a photo, poster, or another piece of artwork that is not in a frame as well as removable hooks. Figure out how many pictures you want to hang and how evenly you want them spaced apart. From there, determine where on the wall you want your adhesive hooks hung. Make sure to they are level as you will be hanging string on them. After leaving the hooks set for an hour, tie string to both of the hooks – this is where the pictures will be hung. Use clothespins to clips artwork, pictures, or posters to the string. Make sure your hooks are strong enough for the gallery you want to hang.

Removable Hooks

Conclusion

There are a variety of ways of hanging pictures without nails so you can protect your walls. This is perfect if you rent or want to move around your gallery regularly to change up the look. Use adhesives, the STAS system, or hooks to hang your pictures without having to put any holes in your wall. Since there are a few different methods, you can find the one that works for you and your home.

how to hang pictures without nails

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How-to's

How to Hang Heavy Pictures on ANY Wall

how-to-hang-a-heavy-picture

Whether you live in an apartment or a large home, you want your place of residence to be an extension of your personality. That is why it is very common for people to hang pictures or artwork on the walls. The images displayed gives visitors to your home a glimpse of your soul.

The fact that everyone hangs pictures may make one believe that the process is easy. You simply take a hammer and a nail, anchor, or fastener, insert it into the wall and hang up the picture. However, nothing is ever easy and that is the case when it comes to how to hang heavy pictures.

⚠ Just preparing to hang a picture or artwork requires you to damage a wall because you are making a hole in it. Moreover, a wall, regardless the type, can handle up to only a certain amount of weight. Heavy pictures should be handled carefully. Unless you set up a picture rail system or use a comparable method (some outlined below), they are likely to cause significant damage.

Jump to:

How to Hang A Heavy Picture On Drywall and Plaster
How To Hang Heavy Pictures On Brick Walls
How to Hang Heavy Pictures with Rail-based Systems (STAS)


Preparing to Hang a Heavy Picture

Hollow walls or plasterboard walls, also known as drywall, can hold 40-pounds in pull out load for every 12-inches by 12-inches of distance. People who hang pictures on this type of wall are counseled to find a stud behind the wall in which to nail in an anchor. There are tools available to help you find studs. For example, there are magnetic stud finders that find metal fasteners in the wall; electronic stud finders that can accurately find the center of a stud; or you can tap on the wall to find the stud physically. As you tap you listen for a change in sound. Although this method is often used, it is not always precise.

Studs are commonly spaced about 16-inches apart and are usually about 1-1/2-inches thick. So there is a good chance that a stud is not located in the area where you want to mount your picture. Therefore, the chances are you will be anchoring a heavy picture in a void between studs. That’s okay if the wall can take the weight.

If you are not sure if the wall can take the weight, then it is suggested you use a single 1 ½-inch or 2-inch finishing nail. It is advised that you drive the nail into the wall in at least a 45-degree angle. The angle of the nail offers greater holding capability than using a nail that is hammered straight into the wall.

There are a plethora of alternatives to using a nail. For example, there are picture-hanging hooks that include a small-diameter nail. They are available from hardware stores in a range of sizes and they can hold a heavy weight if properly used. It is suggested that you insert the nail through the hook’s sleeve and hold it against the wall to determine the desired height of the picture. The hook will automatically align the nail to the optimum angle. Once the height is determined, use a hammer to tap the nail into the wall. Take care not to hit the hook because it can damage the wall.

Screws, a toggle bolt, molly bolt or spiral anchor are good alternatives to a nail when determining how to hang heavy pictures. The spiral anchor is easiest to install. Simply insert into the wall with a screwdriver and then push a screw into the anchor. Some spiral anchors include special picture-hanging hooks to help balance the frame.

Other Ways to Hang Heavy Pictures

Other fasteners you can use when it comes to how to hang heavy pictures include:

  • Threaded Toggle
  • Threaded Brass Anchor
  • Threaded Plastic Anchor
  • Medium Plastic Anchor
  • Large Picture Hanger
  • Medium Picture Hanger
  • Small Picture Hanger
  • WallBiter™ Picture Hanger
  • Wire Hanger

Tests have been performed on fasteners to determine how much weight each can handle. Here are the results of those tests.

  • A ¼-inch Toggle Bolt failed at more than 300 pounds
  • A Threaded Toggle failed at more than 200 pounds
  • An 1/8 Molly Bolt failed at 170 pounds
  • A Brass Threaded Anchor failed at 130 pounds
  • A Plastic Threaded Anchor failed at 110 pounds
  • A Medium Plastic Anchor and Large Picture Hanger failed at 80 pounds
  • A Medium Picture Hanger failed at 70 pounds
  • A Small Picture Hanger failed at 60 pounds
  • A WallBiter™ Picture Hanger failed at 100 pounds
  • A Wire Hanger failed at 50 pounds

How to Hang A Heavy Picture On Drywall and Plaster

Tools or other items necessary for hanging a picture include:

✓ Fasteners
✓ Pencil or painter’s tape
✓ Drill
✓ Nails
✓ Picture Frame
✓ Tape Measure
✓ Scrap of Wood
✓ Level
✓ Bathroom Scale

  1. Weigh the picture. The weight of the picture will help you determine what kind of fastener to use and how you will install it to the wall. You can use a regular bathroom scale to perform the weighing. Pictures up to 10-pounds are classified as light loads. Pictures weighing between 10-pounds and 25-pounds are classified as a medium load. Pictures weighing 25-pounds to 50-pounds are heavy loads. The fastener’s package provides its weight range.
  2. What kind of wall are you working with? Homes constructed in the 1940s or earlier commonly have plaster walls. Most modern homes have drywall.
  3. Where are you going to hang the picture? Find a spot that is about eye-level, hold the picture frame against the wall, and mark the location of the top of the frame with a pencil or painter’s tape.
  4. Mark the wall. Make a mark with the pencil where you intend to drill or nail in the fastener. If the frame has a D-ring or other type of metal loop on its back, then measure from the top of the frame to the height of the ring and mark those points. Now measure from the location of the top of the frame to the location of the ring on the wall and mark the spot with the pencil. This will be the location where you will install the fastener with a drill or nail.If there is wire across the back of the frame, use a tape measure to pull up the wire as high as it will go. Measure from this point to the top of the frame. Remove the tape measure and measure the distance down from the original mark you made on the wall with the pencil and use the pencil to mark this spot. This is where you will drill or nail a fastener into the wall to hang a frame with wire across its back.
  5. Determine a second hanging point.This will help to ensure that the wall can accommodate a heavy picture. If there is a wire on the back of the frame, hold the wire at the desired hanging point with two fingers. The farther apart the fingers, the more stable the frame will hang.Measure from the two points to the top of the frame and mark that measurement onto the wall with the pencil. Rather than determining the two hanging points with two fingers, you can use a scrap piece of wood instead. Use a piece of wood about half the width of the frame and place it under the hanging wire to determine the two hanging points.Mark the location of the two corners of the wood with the pencil. These points will be where you will hang the fasteners. Use the tape measure to measure the distance between the wood and the top of the frame and place the wood piece underneath the original mark on to the current mark. Even the wood using a level and then draw a line across the top of the wood. The end points of the line will be where you hang the two fasteners.
  6. Find a stud. It is best to hang the picture on a stud so that the wall can accommodate for the weight of the frame. Studs behind drywall are located about 16-inches apart.If the picture is wider than the distance between two studs, use a level and two screws to place the piece of wood into the wall. Make certain that the screws go into at least two studs. Fasten picture hangers into the wood at desired intervals using nails or screws depending on the type of fastener required and hang the picture on to both picture hangers.If the picture is narrower than the distance between two studs, then install the picture hanger into a stud. Use a hanger that requires several nails to ensure strength. Hammer the nails into the stud, then hang the picture on the hanger. If hanging the frame on a plaster wall use screws, not nails, to secure the hanger.
  7. Position and hang.Once the fasteners are (ideally) in the stud line up your picture and hang! Use the level to make sure the positioning is straight as possible.

More notes on weight:

⚠ Picture hangers with one nail can hold up to 25-pounds and hangers with two nails can accommodate up to 50-pounds.

⚠ Anchor bolts or fasteners mentioned above can be used when hanging heavy pictures as a substitute to picture hangers.

How to Hang Heavy Pictures on Brick Walls

Another common type of wall people struggle with when determining how to hang something heavy in their home is a brick wall.

Tools or other materials necessary for hanging pictures on brick walls include:

✓ Cardboard or Newspaper
✓ Clear Tape
✓ Tape Measure
✓ Carpenter’s Level
✓ Masonry Bit
✓ Black Marker
✓ Drill
✓ Wall Anchor With Screw
✓ Hammer
✓ Screwdriver

Eight steps are involved in the project. Before starting the work, determine what is behind the brick. Don’t drill into a chimney flue or similar channels that run through or behind the wall. Never ever drill into brick because it could crack or shatter.

  1. Determine a good location for the picture.This can be achieved by maneuvering the frame around the wall until it is in a spot for comfortable viewing. As alternative to moving a heavy frame around, create a template by putting the frame on a piece of cardboard, newspaper or similar material and use a black marker to trace the dimensions of the frame on to it. Cut out the template and tape it to the wall temporarily to verify a permanent location.
  2. Use a pencil or piece of clear tape to mark the top of the frame or paper. Remove the frame or paper and use a tape measure to ascertain the precise distance between the top of the frame and the hanging point and use a pencil or marker to transfer that point to the wall.
  3. Place a level in alignment to the hanging mark. As you hold the level find the nearest mortar joint. Select a point on the mortar joint where you will drill a hole and mark that spot with the pencil or marker.
  4. Place the masonry drill bit into the drill. Use the tape measure or ruler to measure an inch from the tip of the drill bit down toward the drill. Wrap a piece of tape or use a black marker to draw on the spot that is directly above the 1-inch point. This mark will assist you in gauging the depth of the drill bit as you drill it into the wall.
  5. Drill through the mark into the mortar joint. Stop drilling when you reach the depth marked on the bit. Take out the drill bit and clean out the mortar dust from the hole.
  6. Use a hammer to insert a plastic anchor in front of the hole. Tap the anchor until its rim is flush with the wall surface.
  7. Drive a screw into the anchor. Anchors are commonly available with a screw. If the anchor you are using doesn’t have a screw, use one that is designed to fit snugly into the anchor insert.
  8. Grasp the anchor and wiggle it to ensure it is secure. If so, hang the picture by hooking the wire or hook over the screw. If the screw is not secure, tighten so that it is.

If you decide to use two hanging points and they do not appear over mortar joints, then use a hook-and-wire hanging style, one hook in the center of the frame, or move the hangers to align with mortar joints. It is best to use a wire hanging style or two hangers if the picture is heavy.

How to Hang Heavy Pictures with a Rail-based System

A properly installed rail-based system is the best solution for not only full control over picture positioning, but wall integrity. Hanging a large picture is inherently damaging to your walls. Some things are simply too large and, no matter what, you will have to add more and more nails, screws, and fasteners to your walls. A reliable system, like STAS, provides full control and protection:

Each system is specifically designed and manufactured to accommodate an array of issues that could threaten the integrity of a structure and assures that the weight of heavy picture or artwork frames are not focused on one area, but spread out through a rail.

Perlon cords, zipper hooks, and rails are the essential components for hanging heavy pictures. The cords and zipper hooks hold the frames while the rails accommodate the total weight of the frames.

The zipper hooks work in conjunction with the perlon cord to hold a maximum weight of 33-pounds. The smartspring hooks each hold 9-pounds. If multiple hooks are used on a single cord each hook will bear its maximum weight capacity as long as the rail handles the bulk of the weight.

If a system is required to hold more weight than it was designed for, then all you need to do is add more hooks and cords to increase the weight capacity. For example, using two more perlon cords and two zipper hooks will permit the system to hold an additional 66-pounds.

Rail Type Weight Capacity
Cliprail System 44-lbs/yd
Cliprail Max System 55-lbs/yd
Minirail Package 55-lbs/yd
U-Rail Pro Package 65-lbs/yd
Cliprail Pro System 99-lbs/yd
Prorail Crown System 99-lbs/yds
Prorail Flat Rails 99-lbs/yds

If you’re interested in a picture hanging system to handle heavy weights the Cliprail Pro System would be a strong choice. Even though the rail is considered ‘heavy-duty’ it is visibly compact and sleek. It combines perfectly with other rail systems and holds up to 99 pounds per linear yard. THAT is a heavy-duty hanger. Watch the video below for a better understanding of the STAS-brand Cliprail Pro:

More About STAS Picture Hanging Systems

If you decide to use your own picture hanging rails, you will need to determine the weight capacity of the rail used in the system.

You select the amount and length of rails as well as their color and wall type. Each system is all-inclusive. Everything necessary from clip screws and plugs to hooks, rails and cords are included. End caps or corner caps are available to cover each end of the rail creating a very clean finish to rails or tracks that don’t at an adjacent wall. Connectors are available to combine two or more pieces of rail together creating a seamless single rail for as long as the eye can see.

There is no need to rely on your limited knowledge of how to hang heavy frames or rely on the limited knowledge of a salesperson in a chain store or small, local hardware store, who has only the traditional methods of hanging pictures on his or her mind. Shades Picture Hanging Systems are the foolproof way of avoiding all possible problems that can result from hanging heavy pictures. Flexible, affordable, elegant and most importantly time and cost effective are just a few of the adjectives that best describe our systems. Our consistent 5 out of 5 star ratings attest to how you’ll feel when you’ve finished installing and displaying your artwork now and in the future.

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How-to'sInspiration

Here’s How to Hang a Tapestry (with Inspiration)

tapestry-pieces

A tapestry is a simple way to cover up boring white walls in any room of your home. They also express your personality and add texture to areas that tend to be bland. Tapestries come in all different colors and sceneries to match your décor. So just how do you hang these tapestries? There are a few easy steps to follow so you can spruce up your walls in no time.

Hanging Tapestries 101

There are many ways to present your tapestries. Some are more attractive than others, but any of these methods will surely do the job.

Rail-based Installation System

Arguably the simplest way to hang a tapestry is with a rail-based system. Piecemeal picture hanging systems allow you to hang tapestries of any size and weight on any wall in just a few minutes. The lightweight, aluminum rail sits close to the ceiling, or however high or low you position it on the wall. The clip system can be adjusted to where you want the tapestry to hang horizontally on the wall. It is easy to flatten out the tapestry against the wall or achieve a loose hanging look with this system because you can adjust the clips to be as tight or as slack as you want.

Rods and Finials

Another easy way to hang a tapestry is with a rod and finials. This only works if your tapestry has a rod pocket, which not all of them do. The rod is similar to a curtain rod and will need brackets for hanging – similar to hanging a window curtain. The tapestry will not be flush to the wall with this method, but it will be flat on the rod.

Baseboards

A baseboard is a good way to hang a tapestry if you want the tapestry flush against the wall. The baseboard should be slightly shorter than the width of the tapestry and needs to fit in the rod pocket. Drill two holes in the baseboard that match up to where you want the tapestry to hang on the wall. If the tapestry is heavy, make sure to use anchors to ensure it stays securely in place. Put the baseboard in the tapestry and screw the baseboard onto the wall.

Ropes

To create a unique look, you can use a rope to hang the tapestry. This will involve some cutting and a little DIY. Use a thick rope that will securely hold the tapestry – this will also add texture to the tapestry. Cut slits in the tapestry about five inches or eight inches apart, depending how large your tapestry is. Once the slits are cut, thread the rope through the tapestry. Place two screws where the rope ends to hang your tapestry.

Shower Curtain Rod and Hangers

If you do not have rope and your tapestry does not have a rod pocket, you can use the above method with a shower curtain rod and curtain hangers. Cut the slits the same way as stated above and then place curtain hangers in each slot. Place curtain rod brackets where you want the tapestry hung so they are ready to go when the tapestry is set up. After the hangers are in each slot, attach them to the curtain rod and place the setup on the bracket. Flatten out and adjust the tapestry to your liking.

Inspiration for Hanging Tapestries

Now that you know how to hang tapestries, it is time for some inspiration. There are all types of tapestries available, from modern to vintage to medieval style. Tapestries can be put in any room of your home to add a unique element and accent piece. Take a look at these pieces to inspire the décor in your home.

hanging tapestries

Cozy Bedroom – The tapestry is used to enhance the cozy nook in this bedroom. The piece is surrounded by a sheer white canopy with accent lighting, which can be easily done with Christmas lights. The different textures play off each other to create a breezy atmosphere when you want to take a break from the day or winding down for the night.

 

Cozy Bedroom

Hallway Piece – This hallway statement piece is perfect for a near entryway leading into a living room or sitting area. The tapestry has a vintage feel and adds to the Western style décor surrounding it. The dark wood complements the dark colors of scene on the tapestry. The intricate detail and surrounding pieces will add a talking point as well as your guests filter into the home.

 

how-to-hang-tapestry

Living Room Accent – Tapestries make great pieces in the living room because they take up a lot of bare space that would otherwise be boring or empty. This medieval themed tapestry adds texture to a contemporary style living room. Don’t be afraid to mix and match décor styles as that is what makes the décor uniquely you. The combination in this example creates an inviting space with visual interest. (from classictapestries.com)

 

Living Room Accent

Hanging from the Ceiling – Hanging a tapestry from the ceiling would look great in a child’s room or a young teen’s bedroom. This example creates an inviting space while adding texture to the area. The tapestry complements the bright dresser as do the colorful accents in the area. This can be made to look eclectic or to collect your child’s favorite nick knacks.

 

Hanging from the Ceiling

Loft Bed – If you live in a dorm room – or have a loft bed – adding a tapestry to the lower portion creates a nice private area. The tapestry can be pulled back or kept in place while in the sitting area. Not only does this add a unique element to the room, but is also adds personality as well.

 

Tapestry hanging

Entryway Color – Entryways tend to be boring with just a coatrack or a table, but these can be easily brightened up by adding a tapestry. This example pulls colors from the tapestry and adds them to accents on the table. The mirrored design of the table is a neutral color but still reflects the colors of the tapestry, making for an interesting piece. The purple lamps, gold statue, and white stools make the entry area complete.

 

ornate tapestry hanging

Statement Piece – There is nothing better than a large tapestry to make a statement piece, such as in this example. The tall ceilings and open living room call for something large to complement the area. A small tapestry would be lost in the surroundings, but this large piece adds a style element that says elegance. The tapestry can be seen from all areas, such as the top loft area as well as the downstairs sitting area.

 

cool tapestry

Create a Theme – Do you have pieces around your home but don’t really have a theme? A tapestry can add a theme, such as a Southwest theme as shown above. The throw pulls the bright color out of the tapestry and the plant adds to the theme. The light color wood is reminiscent of sand from the desert. Without the tapestry, the theme would be lost.

 

colorful tapestry

An Inspiration Corner – An inspiration corner is a great place to add books, pictures, and a large, colorful tapestry. It can be in any room of the home to add a spark of creativity. The white colors of the bureau, pot, and shelves allow the tapestry to pop off the wall. Add your favorite creative accents to make this corner complete. Top it off with a comfortable sitting chair or chaise to relax and write the next great novel.

 

living room tapestry

Living Room Décor – A tapestry can really pull a living room together, especially when pulling off a vintage Italian theme. The picture of the villa on the tapestry makes you feel like you are in the countryside of Italy. Complete the area with vintage pillows and curtains to complete the feel. Of course, you need fresh Italian wine to enjoy this cozy space.

 

Pulling it All Together

Tapestries come in many different sizes, styles, and colors. Whether you set up with rods or rails, tapestries are simple to hang. Rail systems, in particular, can handle any weight or size tapestry and comes in a variety of styles. Order your system to hang your favorite tapestry to add personality to your room today!

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How-to's

This is How You Should Hang Pictures on Plaster Walls

plaster-wall-hanging

Perhaps the one style wall that could present the most problems when hanging pictures is the plaster wall. It’s difficult to tap in a nail that is long enough to reach a stud without cracking the plaster off the lath. Moreover, it is not only the nail you need to be concerned with. You need to also consider the wall anchor or picture hanger you use to latch on to the picture frame so that it is secure and yet does not damage the wall.

Note: By far the least destructive way to hang items on plaster walls is to install a piecemeal picture hanging system. These aluminum-based rails snap to the perfect height/width of your walls or ceiling. They allow full customization for placement of your art, appliances, mirrors, clocks, and more. These systems, like the STAS rail system, are PERFECT for plaster wall hanging.

Jump to: HANGING PICTURES ON PLASTER WALLS WITH PICTURE RAILS >>

Standard picture hanger hooks also known as “J” shaped metal hooks work well when hanging pictures on plaster walls. They come in various sizes and can hold up to 100 pounds. Another good fastener plaster hook are toggle bolts. They are available in a variety of diameters and lengths to accommodate the different thicknesses of a wall and have the best holding capability. They require drilling a large opening so that the spring-loaded toggle can be inserted. Another choice that would work well is a plastic hook or adhesive hangers. Wood screws will also work, but they should be installed into a stud. Of course, there is always the “trusted” hammer and nail method.

However, be aware that hammering a nail can crack the plaster. So it is recommended that you use a drill to create a pilot hole and then if you are using a wall anchor, insert the cylinder into the hole and then tighten the bolts so that the cylinder compresses against the sides of the hole. When drilling a pilot hole be sure not to drill too large a hole as your nail will need to grip the edges of the hole to sustain ample weight. A rule of thumb is to use a drill bit half the size of the nail.

Mounting Pictures On Plaster Walls

Before starting any work on mounting pictures to plaster walls, it is advised that you weigh the picture you intend to mount. A lightweight picture is considered to be 5 pounds or less. In addition, take into account how humid the room is. A humid room can result in moist walls and can cause adhesive bond to weaken quickly.

How to Hang Lightweight Pictures on Plaster Walls

  1. Clean and dry the wall. Cleaning ensures that there is no oil, dirt, or moisture that could prevent adhesive glue from clinging to the wall. It also prevents mildew that can form in the porous plaster. Perform the cleaning using warm water and a mild liquid dish soap. Soak a non-abrasive washcloth in the warm water; place a bead of mild soap on the cloth and work the soap into a small patch of suds on it. Wipe the wall down and scrub it gently with a circular motion. Rinse the cloth in the water and wipe away any soap residue. Wipe away the moisture with a dry non-abrasive washcloth with a circular motion.
  2. Select an adhesive hanger. Such a fastener should be able to hold a light picture frame. Adhesive hooks are available in an assortment of shapes and sizes. Check the package instructions for information on weight capacities as they differ from brand to brand. In addition, make certain that the hook can accommodate the picture loop or wire hanger that is attached to the back of the frame. Picture hangers with a piece of double-sided tape should suffice for pictures without frames that are very light and more moderately weighted pictures without frames might be able to hang directly on an adhesive square instead of a hook. Still, a plaster hook is probably best.
  3. Attach the adhesive hook to the wall. One side of the adhesive square should be identified as the “wall side” and the other side should be labeled the “hook side” or “picture side.” Attach the “wall side” of the adhesive pad to the wall and press the hook on to the “hook side” of the pad. If the picture hooks are too thick to fit into the hoop on the frame, then consider using two hooks instead where the bottom edge of the picture will rest. Position the hooks evenly and horizontally and space them a little closer than the bottom width of the picture.
  4. Hang the picture! When the hook is in place, hang the frame’s loop on the wall hook. You can rest the bottom of the picture on top of two hooks if you prefer.

How to Hang Medium to Heavyweight Picture Frames on Plaster Walls

You should take more precautions if you are hanging a medium to heavyweight picture frame. This process should take seven steps.

  1. Determine where to hang the picture. Since the picture is of moderate or heavy weight, you should seek more support. Locate a stud in the wall with a stud finder. Use a tape measure to ascertain where the picture loop is on the back of the frame and use your calculations to determine where the screw should go on the wall and mark the spot using a pencil.
  2. Place painter’s tape over the mark. Poke a hole in the middle of the tape with the tip of the pencil and then place the tape on the wall where the hole aligns with the mark on the wall. You can also use the hole in the tape to serve as a guide when drilling the pilot hole into the wall.
  3. Carefully drill a hole in the plaster wall. Before drilling check the package instructions to determine the size of the drill bit, then drill a hole into the wall along the mark. Commonly, a 1-3/16 bit will suffice. The bit should be a fraction smaller than the anchor you are using. While you drill the hole the bit will stop moving inward when it hits the end of the plaster. If it starts to move again, then it is possible you have hit a layer of lath beneath the plaster. Drill as straight as possible. The size of the hole should be no larger than the size of the bit.
  4. Hammer an anchor into the wall. Make certain that the anchor is directly over the hole in the wall, tap it into the hole with just enough force to get it in without bending it or cracking the wall and finish with the anchor flush with the wall.
  5. Place the screw into the anchor. Put the screw into the hole of the anchor and use a screwdriver to force it in. Stop screwing before the anchor is flush against the wall. You can also use the drill to drive the screw. Work slowly and be careful not to let the screw drive too deep into the wall. About a half inch of the screw should remain out from the wall.
  6. Clean the area. Repeat step one from the description of how to hang a lightweight picture onto a plaster wall.
  7. Hang the picture. Rest the wire or loop on the back of the frame onto the anchor.

How To Hang A Heavy Picture On A Plaster Wall with the Stas System

The piecemeal method of collecting the necessary equipment to ensure that heavy picture frames stay in place without any chance of damaging walls may be adequate. However, a system that includes all the necessary pieces properly installed is the best way to ensure that the heaviest of picture frames are adequately supported but also stay in place.

Here’s the rail-system method:

We offer eight different STAS designed and manufactured high-quality picture hanging solutions for a wide range of applications including:

  • Residential and Non-residential Construction Projects
  • Office and Commercial Properties
  • Schools and Universities
  • Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities
  • Retirement Homes and Assisted Living Facilities
  • Government Institutions and Public Housing
  • Condominiums and Rental Properties
  • Museums and Galleries
  • Hotels, Inns, and Bed & Breakfast Services

The eight styles include:

1. Minirail
2. Cliprail
3. Cliprail Pro
4. Cliprail Max
5. J-Rail
6. J-Rail Max
7. Plaster Rail
8. Prorail Crown

Each system is specifically designed and manufactured to accommodate an array of issues that could threaten the integrity of a structure and assures that the weight of heavy picture or artwork frames are not focused on one area, but spread out through a rail.

Perlon cords, zipper hooks, and rails are the essential components for hanging heavy pictures. The cords and zipper hooks hold the frames while the rails accommodate the total weight of the frames.

The Zipper hooks work in conjunction with either the steel cable or the perlon cord to hold a maximum weight of 33-pounds. The Smartspring hooks each hold 9-pounds. If multiple hooks are used on a single cord each hook will bear its maximum weight capacity as long as the rail handles the weight.

If a system is required to hold more weight than it was designed for, then all you need to do is add more hooks and cords to increase the weight capacity. For example, using two more perlon cords and two zipper hooks will permit the system to hold an additional 66-pounds.

Installing A Rail Hanging System

Items you will need for hanging stuff on plaster walls include:

✓ Pencil or marker
✓ Heavy-duty wire cutter or pliers that can cut wire
✓ Painters’ or masking tape
✓ Drill and bit
✓ Picture rail hooks
✓ Picture rail hangers
✓ Picture molding hooks
✓ Braided cord or wire
✓ Eyelet screws with D- ring

Picture rail hooks and picture molding hooks come in a wide variety of styles, shapes, and sizes. Brass hooks are suggested when hanging very heavy pictures or artwork and stamped hooks are ideal for hanging lighter pictures.

hanging pictures on plaster walls

Here are step-by-step instructions on how to hang pictures on picture rail.

  1. Install eyelet screws with a D-ring on top of the right and left side of the frame. The higher you install the screws, the flatter the picture will hang on the wall. On the other hand, the lower on the picture frame you place the screws, the more the frame will tilt forward. Drill a pilot hole in the frame, but make sure you don’t drill all the way through the frame.
  2. Screw in the eyelet screws.
  3. Hold the picture against the wall at the height you want it to hang. Mark the spot on the wall above the center of the frame.
  4. Place a hook on the rail directly above the center mark.
  5. Lay the picture frame face down on a table and place a strip of painters’ tape or masking tape across the frame just above the eyelet screws.
  6. Mark the position of the screws as well as the center spot of the frame onto the tape. Measure how far the screws are from the top of the frame and transfer to the wall by measuring that distance below the center mark on the wall.
  7. Take the tape off of the back of the frame and place it on the wall at the marks you made.
  8. Hang a cord or wire over the hook on the rail and line up with the marks you made that represent the locations of the eyelet screws. Make a bend in the cord or wire where it meets the tape and make sure that a mark is made in the cord or wire after the bend.
  9. Thread the cord or wire through the rings of the eyelet screws and stop when you get to the mark made by the bending of the wire or cord.
  10. Wrap the cord or wire tightly around the screws so that it is secure and then tie the ends together securely so there is no slack in the middle of the frame. Make sure you make a strong knot.
  11. Drape the cord or wire over the hook.
  12. Slide the cord or wire back and forth over the hook until the picture hangs straight.

Rails, perlon cord and steel cable can be cut to size and multiple STAS Smartspring hooks or STAS Zipper hooks can be used on a single cord or cable. Just be certain the maximum allowed weight is not exceeded. A template is included with the rail to assist you in drilling at the proper height according to the rail type. The template is also available on the Shades website under Documentation/Mounting instructions/Drilling Template.

There is no need to rely on your limited knowledge of how to hang heavy frames or rely on the limited knowledge of a salesperson in a chain store or small, local hardware store. Shades Picture Hanging Systems are the foolproof way to ensure that possible problems that can result from hanging heavy pictures will never occur.

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How-to's

How to Hang a Heavy Mirror

how-hang-mirror

It is not uncommon to find at least one heavy mirror hanging from a wall of a home. Framed mirrors can be very heavy and you need to consider that when hanging them. It is said that a framed mirror weighs about 5-pounds to 6-pounds per square foot. So if a mirror measures 30-feet x 40-feet, then it will weigh a total of 46-pounds (30-feet x 40-feet/144 = 8.33 x 5.5 = 46-lbs.)

⚠ Note, hanging heavy mirrors does not have to be strenuous or destructive. You can protect the condition of your walls by avoiding traditional hanging techniques. Using a kit like the STAS picture hanging system provides lasting integrity after one installation. Feel total freedom moving your heavy mirrors and large paintings. The Stas System may be your long-term solution. Read more about how to hang a heavy mirror with the STAS system here.

If you are considering hanging your mirror via traditional, invasive means, there are a few roads to take. Two methods are commonly used to hang a wall mount mirror. They include hanging wire, and french cleats. (image courtesy of freshome.com)

Jump to:

Hanging a Heavy Mirror with Wire
Hanging a Heavy Mirror with Cleats
Hanging A Heavy Mirror Using The STAS Rail Mounting Systems

Items You Will Need for Traditional Hanging

✓ Wall Mount Mirror
✓ Stud Finder
✓ Tape Measure
✓ Pencil
✓ Drill
✓ Screw Driver Drill Bit
✓ Level
✓ Pliers
✓ Offset Board
✓ Clean Wash Cloth
✓ Mirror Hanging Hardware (D-rings, metal wire, French cleats, hanging screws). Make sure that the hanging screws are rated to hold a weight greater than the weight of the mirror. Consider that the weight of the mirror increases when you pull it away from the wall to clean under it.

⚠ Purchase screws that correlate with the weight of your mirror.

⚠ Enlist the help of one assistant to perform this task. The mirror can be quite heavy and you will need his or her help to handle it.

Preliminary Work

There is some preparation work that needs to be performed when tackling the task of how to hang a heavy mirror.

First, determine where you want to mount the mirror. You want a location that is free of clutter and in enough space that can accommodate its size. Moreover, you want it to be high enough so that a person looking into it can look at himself in the eyes. Of course, there are always exceptions. This would include placing the mirror over the mantle of a fireplace.

Once you have selected a location, use the washcloth to clean the wall where you intend to place the wall mount mirror. In addition, ensure that there is a large space free of objects that you could encounter when performing the work.

Next, use a stud finder to locate the wooden support beams (called studs) that are behind the wall. These studs are evenly spaced and should be used to support the weight of the mirror. So it is important that the screws and nails you use to hang the wall mount mirror actually go directly through a stud.

Use the pencil to mark the outside edges of each stud in the area where you intend to put the mirror. These marks will help you to precisely place the mirror for hanging.

Use the tape measure or ruler between the pencil marks to determine the center of each stud and mark the spot with the pencil. The center portion of a stud is said to be the strongest, most stable place from which to hang the mirror.

Hanging A Wall Mount Mirror Using Wire

image via aprettyfix.com

If you intend to use wire to hang the wall mount mirror then:

1. Use the tape measure to determine the center of the mirror. If you measure the length and width of the mirror, then the middle point of those measurements taken together identifies the exact center. Use the pencil to mark the location and also mark the center spot for each of its edges on the back of the frame.

2. Place the D-rings on the back of the mirror. Use the tape measure to locate a spot about 6-inches (15.24 cm) from the top of each side of the back of the mirror and place one D-ring in each spot. The D-ring is necessary to guide the wire that will keep the mirror even and balanced as it is hanging.

3. Take a long length of wire, double it and then thread it through one of the screw eyes of the D-ring and then down to the screw eye of the D-ring on the other side of the frame. Make certain that you leave some slack in the wire so that it can accommodate a support that will be mounted to the wall.

4. Use pieces of remaining wire to reinforce the hanging wire. To do this simply cut four medium size lengths of wire and wrap a length tightly around the hanging wire several times. Crimp the scrap wire closed with the pliers. Make sure to secure the scrap wire to each of the screw eyes on the D-ring. Perform the same procedure on the other D-ring.

5. Loop the wire through the remaining screw eye and then crimp the wire closed with the pliers.

6. With assistance from your partner, lift the mirror to the desired position and have your partner mark the wall with the pencil above the top of the center portion of the frame and then carefully lower the mirror back down into a safe place.

7. Use the level and pencil to draw a line across the wall that is exactly parallel to the floor. This line will help you judge if the mirror is hanging straight. Place the level on the wall at the top-center mark you just made. When the bubble of the level is correctly positioned between the two lines in the horizontal tube, carefully draw a straight line along the edge.

8. Use the marks you made to identify the location of the studs and select two studs that are in the proximity of where you want to hang the mirror. The wider apart the studs are, the better. Make certain that they are not outside the edges of the mirror. Draw a straight line from the center of these studs to the top horizontal line. Measure to a point about 4-inches to 5-inches (10.16 cm to 12.5 cm) from the top line along the centerline of each stud and mark the spot with the pencil. Use the level to ensure that these points are aligned horizontally.

10. Drive a heavy-duty hanging screw into the wall at each of the two positions you just marked. Use a screwdriver attachment to drive the screws into the wall. Make certain that there is enough of the screw left protruding out from the wall to hold the wire.

11. Slowly lift and carefully place the mirror’s wire onto the two hanging screws. Make certain that the wire is securely hanging on both mirror hangers and then slowly and carefully let go of the mirror so that the screws are holding the load.

12. Adjust the mirror so that it hangs straight. Use the horizontal line on the wall or a level to tweak the mirror’s position so that it is hanging perfectly straight and parallel to the floor.

13. Clean the pencil marks from the wall. Special cleaning products are available from home improvement stores that will remove pencil marks from the wall.

Hanging A Wall Mount Mirror Using Cleat Mirror Hangers

hanging heavy mirror
image via lowes.com

If you believe that French cleats would more properly accommodate the weight of the mirror you intend to hang, then you should buy them from a home improvement or hardware store or you can make them. A French cleat is a wide, notched fastener that is made of wood or metal. Be sure to purchase a set of cleats that are rated for weights greater than the mirror you intend to hang. If you are inclined to make the cleats yourself then purchase a piece of wood and:

  • Cut a strong piece of board that’s about three-quarters of an inch thick so that it’s length is slightly shorter than the width of the wall mount mirror.
  • Create a 30-degree to 45-degree bevel cut down the length of the board near the center. There should now be two pieces of wood. Each should have a wide face and narrow face as well as a slanted edge. These pieces of wood will fit together to form a sturdy hanger platform for the mirror.

Follow these steps to hang a wall mount mirror using French cleats.

1. Use strong glue or appropriate screws to attach the smaller of the two cleats below the top edge of the mirror with its slanted edge pointing down. Use a level to make certain that it is straight before you glue it. This creates a downward facing hook that will catch onto the wall-mounted cleat.

2. To be certain that the mirror is properly supported on the bottom and that it hangs flush with the wall, you will need to include an offset board. Attach a length of board that is of the same thickness as the cleat to the bottom of the frame of the mirror.

3. Use a level to draw vertical lines through the center of the studs and then use the level again to draw a horizontal line through these new lines at the exact height you want the wall cleat to be. Use the pencil to mark each intersection line of the stud centerlines and the upper horizontal line. This will be the spot you will place the wall cleat.

4. Use sturdy wood screws that are rated for a greater weight than the mirror to install the cleat to the wall. Use the drill to drive the screws through the wooden cleat and into the center of several studs. The cleat should be placed so that its wide face points out from the wall and the slanted portion points up. This will create an upward facing hook to accommodate the cleat on the frame of the mirror.

5. With help from your assistant, lift the mirror and install it so that the two cleat lock together. Slowly release your hold on the mirror until it is fully supported by the cleat.

Note: If you use glue to attach the cleat to the mirror, make certain that it has dried before hanging the mirror.

Hanging A Heavy Mirror Using The STAS Rail Mounting Systems

hang a heavy mirror stas system

Shades Picture Hanging Systems offers eight different STAS designed and manufactured high-quality picture or mirror hanging solutions for a wide range of applications including:

– Residential and Non-residential Construction Projects
– Office and Commercial Properties
– Schools and Universities
– Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities
– Retirement Homes and Assisted Living Facilities
– Government Institutions and Public Housing
– Condominiums and Rental Properties
– Museums and Galleries
– Hotels, Inns, and Bed & Breakfast Services

The eight styles include:

– Minirail
– Cliprail
– Cliprail Pro
– Cliprail Max
– J-Rail
– J-Rail Max
– Plaster Rail
– Prorail Crown

Each system is specifically designed and manufactured to accommodate an array of issues that could threaten the integrity of a structure and assures that the weight of heavy pictures, mirrors or artwork are not focused on one area, but spread out through a rail.

If you want to hang a heavy mirror, the STAS system is for you. The kit is economical with space and causes no wall damage. Watch our video below to learn more:

How Does it Work Exactly?

Perlon cords, zipper hooks, and rails are the essential components for hanging heavy items. The cords and zipper hooks hold the frames while the rails accommodate the total weight of the frames!

The zipper hooks work in conjunction with the perlon cord to hold a maximum weight of 33-pounds. The smartspring hooks each hold 9-pounds. If multiple hooks are used on a single cord each hook will bear its maximum weight capacity as long as the rail handles the bulk of the weight.

If a system is required to hold more weight than it was designed for, then all you need to do is add more hooks and cords to increase the weight capacity. For example, using two more perlon cords and two zipper hooks will permit the system to hold an additional 66-pounds.

Each rail has been tested to determine its weight capacity. Rails used in the Cliprail system can hold 44-lbs/yd. Rails featured in the Cliprail Max system can hold a maximum weight of 55-lbs./yd. Rails included in the Minirail package can accommodate up to 55-lbs/yd. Rails that are contained in the U-rail Pro package can hold up to 65-lbs/yd. The rails used in the Cliprail Pro system holds up to 99-lbs./yd. Prorail crown rails have a maximum capacity of 99-lbs./yd. Prorail Flat rails can bear up to 99-lbs/yds.

If you decide to use your own hanging rails, you will need to determine the weight capacity of the rail used in the system.

You select the amount and length of rails as well as their color and wall type. Each system is all-inclusive. Everything necessary from clip screws and plugs to hooks, rails and cords are included. Combi-caps are available to cover each end of the rail. Connectors are available to combine up to two pieces of rail.

There is no need to rely on your limited knowledge of how to hang heavy mirrors or rely on the limited knowledge of a salesperson in a chain store or small, local hardware store, who has other things on his or her mind besides hanging heavy wall mount mirrors. STAS systems are the foolproof way to ensure that possible problems that can result from hanging heavy mirrors will never occur!

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